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Will Supreme Court allow businesses to not serve the LGBTQ community?

Will Supreme Court allow businesses to not serve the LGBTQ community?

This week the U. S. Supreme Court announced that in the fall it will hear the case “Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission.” The case - which will have many of us LGBTQ Americans on pins and needles - will argue the parameters of one’s right to practice their religion and their right to express themselves freely that’s enshrined in the First Amendment.

In 2012, gay couple David Mullins and Charlie Craig wanted to order a cake for their upcoming wedding reception. With plans to marry in Massachusetts, because same-sex marriage wasn’t legalized in Colorado until 2014, the couple decided to celebrate their nuptials back home. Jack Phillips, owner to Masterpiece Cakeshop informed the couple that because religious views he doesn’t provide cakes for same-sex weddings.

“We do a variety of cakes. We do birthday cakes and shower cakes…. We don’t do Halloween cakes and adult-themed cakes,” Phillips stated in New York Times YouTube.

Many conservatives in Phillips’s camp argue that his position is not a repudiation on same-sex marriage but rather it’s a principled stance to fight for free expression unfettered by the tyranny of political correctness.

“We at Cato have long supported both religious liberty and gay rights, insofar as the agenda of each is consistent with the liberty of unlimited constitutional government,” Roger Pilon, founding director of the Cato Center for Constitutional Studies, said. “But we draw the line when same-sex couples turn around and use government to force venues against their religious beliefs to participate in same-sex ceremonies, as happens too often today.”

Oddly, however, when the argument is framed as Pilon states there’s no room to ensure that LGBTQs will not be discriminated against because of who we are and who we love. And I’m not certain that this government has our back.

As a matter-of-fact, since Trump has taken office I’ve worried about the erosion of LGBTQ civil rights. In February his administration revoked federal guidelines permitting transgender students from using facilities that aligned with their gender identity. This June Trump paid tribute to the 49 LGBTQ victims of last year’s Pulse Nightclub massacre, but failed to issue a proclamation for Pride Month

I am immensely thankful as a married lesbian that I reside in Massachusetts, especially if Trump tries to overturn “Obergefell v. Hodges,” the historic U.S. Supreme Court ruling that legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states. With Trump having potentially three Supreme Court seats to