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Black, Gay and Living in a Voting Rights, NO! Gay Marriage, YES! World

Black, Gay and Living in a Voting Rights, NO! Gay Marriage, YES! World

I now have had ample time to recover—from both shock and in awe—from the Supreme Courts historic decisions announced in the final week of June.

My awe moment is Wednesday, June 26. It was a great day for me as a lesbian American. Historic decisions in both Windsor v. United States and Hollingsworth v. Perry were announced. Not only was DOMA finally struck down, but, so too, the anti-gay proponents of Proposition 8.

In a 5–4 decision the progressive and moderate justices of the Supreme Court ruled Section 3 of DOMA to be unconstitutional, declaring it as "a deprivation of the liberty of the person protected by the Fifth Amendment." Finally all same-gender married couples will be afforded the same 1,000 plus federal protections and benefits as opposite- gender couples.

The proponents of Prop. 8 were finally told to cease and desist, meaning they no longer have legally a homophobic leg to stand on in terms of their anti-gay and obstructionist antics to appeal lower court rulings. California same-gender couples no longer have to do an anxious and cautious walk to the alter worrying about state rulings yo-yoing them around.

My shock moments are Monday, June 24 and Tuesday, June 25.

On Monday, the Court, in a surprising 7-1 ruling, sidestepped the hot-button issue of race in America by throwing the Fisher v. University of Texas back to the lower courts for reconsideration. The present-day argument against employing race-conscious admission policies as a pedagogical benefit for diversity is being usurped, at least in Texas, with debates that class-conscious admission policies would best achieve racial diversity. The Texas Top Ten Percent Plan purports to accept 10 percent of all high school graduating class to their universities. This policy works well so alleges the state. But Texas omits in telling you why: their neighborhoods and high schools are as unabashedly segregated in 2013 as they were in 1954 when the historic Supreme Court Brown vs. Board of Ed. ruling, deemed segregated schools unconstitutional.

On Tuesday, the Court hit with another hard blow. In a 5-4 vote from a glaringly ideologically divided court, the lifeline and heart and soul of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act was gutted.

The Court ruled that Section 4 of the VRA is outdated. Section 4 historically protected African Americans and other disenfranchised people of color. The ruling contests a fictive post-racial premise that