Share

  • The service having id "propeller" is missing, reactivate its module or save again the list of services.
  • The service having id "buzz" is missing, reactivate its module or save again the list of services.

Sex. Feminism. Lesbian Werewolves. An Interview with Allison Moon, Author of Lunatic Fringe

Sex. Feminism. Lesbian Werewolves. An Interview with Allison Moon, Author of Lunatic Fringe

I first met Allison Moon at Burning Man in 2010. I was staying with Camp Beaverton for Wayward Girls, which the lovely and badass Miss Moon helped found in 2006. I was deeply inspired by her radical approach to queer sex education, especially after watching her lead a workshop called “Girl Sex 101,” which actually involved her demonstrating a whole variety of sex acts on a willing volunteer (who happened to be a female-bodied transman) in front of about 100 interested queers on the sunny desert playa. It wasn’t just cerebral. She was actually doing the things she was explaining, right there in front of us; and at the risk of sounding like the ultimate crunchy lezzie cliché, I have to say there was something magical about seeing queer women teaching each other how to enjoy sex with queer women on that bright desert afternoon. I knew that this lady would kick ass at whatever projects she took on in the name of queer art and culture.

Naturally, I was thrilled when I heard she was publishing a novel about lesbian werewolves. I was lucky enough to sit down with this Lambda Literary Fellow for an interview to discuss the book, DIY riot grrrl literary history, the radical act of self-publishing, and lesbian werewolves of course. If you’re in NYC, come hear her read from Lunatic Fringe tomorrow night, Tuesday October 18th at 7pm, at Bluestockings Cafe & Bookstore.

 

Velvetpark: So the first thing I want to ask about this book is how you ended up getting self-published, because that's a pretty radical process that most people probably think is unattainable. So how did that process begin? Were you always going to self-publish, or did you shop it around first and then just say, “f-- them, I'm gonna do this myself?”

Allison Moon: I started the whole process knowing that self-publishing was something that really inspired me; but I also got a lot of feedback from people that it was a horrible idea. Basically people responded in one of two ways: some said, “Yes, self-publishing, do it, do it! The democratization of art!” But on the other side, there was, “Well, no one will ever read you, you'll never get respect, academia will ignore you.” So I got a lot of really mixed messages. But I was really inspired