The War On Christmas, Not Going Away Any Time Soon

  • The service having id "propeller" is missing, reactivate its module or save again the list of services.
  • The service having id "buzz" is missing, reactivate its module or save again the list of services.
The War On Christmas, Not Going Away Any Time Soon

With Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Winter Solstice, and Christmas all celebrated this time of year, one would think that we would embrace an all-inclusive seasonal greeting emblematic of our nation’s religious landscape with two simple words—Happy Holidays!

This year the  controversy started with the inanity over the new design of Starbucks red holiday cup that didn’t have a Christmas theme or the greeting “Merry Christmas.”

“Starbucks REMOVED CHRISTMAS from their cups because they hate Jesus. Do you realize that Starbucks wanted to take Christ and Christmas off of their brand new cups? That’s why they’re just plain red.” Joshua Feuerstein wrote spewing an anti-Starbucks rant on Facebook that went viral. 

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump helped stoke the frenzy. “I have one of the most successful Starbucks in Trump Tower,” Trump stated during one of his campaign stump. “Maybe we should boycott Starbucks? By the way, that’s the end of that lease but who cares."

Trump tied his verbal boycott of Starbucks (Trump Towers in NYC, however, are servicing Starbucks drinks in the holiday red cups.) to one of his presidential promises. “I’m a good Christian,” Trump stated in October. "If I become president, we're gonna be saying Merry Christmas at every store ... You can leave happy holidays at the corner.”

But more than a decade now, when this holiday season rolls around we can always count on a yearly kerfuffle  about what the appropriated season’s greeting should be, exemplifying the continued chapter in the culture “War on Christmas.”

Sadly, the kerfuffle concerning  Christmas is right here in my liberal backyard, too In 2012 the then governor of Rhode Island, Lincoln Chafee, tried to avoid the controversy he generated  by calling the state house Christmas tree a “holiday tree.”’The Daily Mail reported, "The governor defended his decision by arguing that it is in keeping with the state’s founding in 1636 by religious dissident Roger Williams as a haven for tolerance —where government and religion were kept separate." 

The decorated evergreen coniferous tree that has come to be known as the Christmas tree began in 16th century Northern Germany. And Martin Luther, the 16th-century Protestant reformer, is the first to add lighted candles to the tree. But traditions are hard to let go of or to modify or even to expand to include our present-day religiously diverse and atheist landscape.

For example, in 2005 when Nova Scotian tree farmer Donnie Hatt gave Boston its tree, Hatt told the Boston Globe that