Pop Theory 18: We Still Need Feminist Spaces

  • The service having id "propeller" is missing, reactivate its module or save again the list of services.
  • The service having id "buzz" is missing, reactivate its module or save again the list of services.
Pop Theory 18: We Still Need Feminist Spaces

[Editor's Note: This piece first appeared at AfterEllen on 16 August 2012.]

There have been some pretty asinine responses to the Aurora massacre (not to mention the Sikh Temple shooting in Wisconsin)—because, clearly, costumes, and not guns, kill people. But one of the most sophisticated responses to the event was penned by Hugo Schwyzer, entitled “Why Most Mass Murderers Are Privileged White Men,” in which he argues that the location and scale of the attack as causal factors attributable to Holmes’ race and the innate feelings of privilege associated with being white:

Perhaps the greatest asset that unearned privilege conveys is the sense that public spaces “belong” to you. If you are—like James Holmes last week, or Charles Whitman, who killed 16 people on the University of Texas, Austin campus in 1966—an American-born, college-educated white man from a prosperous family, you don’t have a sense that any place worth being is off-limits to the likes of you. White men from upper middle-class backgrounds expect to be both welcomed and heard wherever they go. When that sense of entitlement gets frustrated, as it can for a host of complex psychological reasons, it is those same hyper-privileged men who are the most likely to react with violent, rage-filled indignation. For white male murderers from “nice” families, the fact that they chose public spaces like schools, university campuses, or movie theaters as their targets suggests that they saw these places as legitimately theirs.

White men from prosperous families grow up with the expectation that our voices will be heard. We expect politicians and professors to listen to us and respond to our concerns. We expect public solutions to our problems. And when we’re hurting, the discrepancy between what we’ve been led to believe is our birthright and what we feel we’re receiving in terms of attention can be bewildering and infuriating. Every killer makes his pain another’s problem. But only those who’ve marinated in privilege can conclude that their private pain is the entire world’s problem with which to deal. This is why, while men of all races and classes murder their intimate partners, it is privileged young white dudes who are by far the likeliest to shoot up schools and movie